Amcas Essay Example

In this article, Medical School Personal Statements that can beat 52,323 Applications, you will learn to create a sincere, interesting, and thoughtful essay that highlights your strengths and qualities.

Remember:

With more than 50,000 applicants to medical school this year, only those with a compelling story will be selected to interview.

What else:

While metrics, such as the MCAT and GPA, are crucial, admissions committee members view applications holistically meaning who you are and what is important to you matters just as much as your “numbers.” 

We’ve got you covered:

Below are some strategies you can employ that will help you stand out from the crowd.

Getting Started

Let’s get started:

Whether you’re applying to AMCAS, TMDSAS, or AACOMAS essay prompts are generally not topic-driven like a traditional essay you might write for an academic class. So let us guide you to understand Medical School Personal Statements that can beat 52,323 Applications.

Keep in mind:

We encourage applicants to try and write a topic-driven essay that has a distinct theme.

“I have a great theme, why I want to be a doctor.”

Of course, from time to time, a student might write a beautiful essay with a theme, but, most of the time these essays do not succeed in telling an applicant’s story comprehensively and convincingly.

 

Related:Too Early to Start Working on Your 2018 Medical School Application? – When to Start Your First Draft

 

I don’t have anything to write about.

Of course you have a story.Everyone does. 

Here is a list of questions that can help a student find key elements of his or her story.

How should you start your medical school personal statement?

You hear conflicting advice. Some tell you not to open with a story. Others tell you to always begin with a story. Regardless of the advice you receive, be sure to do three things:

1) Be true to yourself. Everyone will have an opinion regarding what you should and should not write. Follow your own instincts. Your personal statement should be a reflection of you, and only you.

2) Start your personal statement with something catchy.Think about the list of potential topics above. 

3) Don’t rush your work. Don’t panic. Composing great documents takes time and you don’t want your writing and ideas to be sloppy and underdeveloped.

Medical school personal statements that can beat 52,323 applications.

SHOW, DON’T TELL

Know this mantra:

Something my clients hear me say throughout the application process, and a common mantra for anyone who works in admissions, is to “show” rather than “tell.”

What does this mean, exactly?

It means that whether you are writing a personal statement or interviewing, you should show evidence for what you are trying to communicate.

Here’s an example.

In a personal statement, never say that you are compassionate and empathetic; instead, demonstrate that you possess these qualities by offering concrete examples.

Medical School Personal Statements that can beat 52,323 Applications via GIPHY

Also keep in mind:

Like your personal statement, your interview responses, too, should evoke all the qualities and characteristics that your interviewer is seeking.  Again, show don’t tell. 

And consider this:

The following is a medical school interview question, “Tell me about your most valuable shadowing experience and why it was important to you.”

Hit them with this kind of answer:

“My most valuable experience was shadowing Dr. Brit. I really learned so much about oncology, which I found fascinating. I would go home every night and read about what I had heard and learned. But I also enjoyed watching him talk to patients. I noticed that he held each patient’s hand, listened to them attentively and made clear to each person that he really cared.”

And there’s more:

By talking about his mentor, this applicant shows his understanding of the importance of compassionate care, and in expressing this, further suggests that these ideals are important to him, too.

The mantra “show, don’t tell” cannot be said enough. Remember this throughout every stage, written documents and interviews, of the medical admissions process.

Where can I find further inspiration? Need help with your personal statement med school?

1) Click hereto visit the Student Doctor Network website to find out how other students are preparing to write their personal statements.

2) Click hereto see what students on the Reddit medical school personal statement premed forum are saying about their personal statements. 

3) Your application materials must be authentic, but sometimes a little inspiration helps. Read The MedEdits Guide to Medical School Admissions. There you will find examples of ‘successful’ personal statements and application entries.

I would like more resources about medical school personal statements and how to apply.

RELATED: What to Watch out for in Medical School Interviews

Where should I look?

For those of you who love to drink coffee and stay up until the roosters come out.Here’s a great “go to” list where you can read about more personal statement and application topics.

1) Click here to visit www.AAMC.org to learn about AMCAS, the allopathic (M.D) application service.

2) Click here to visit the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine website to review important requirements for your AACOMAS application. 

3) If you want to apply to most medical schools in Texas, you will need to complete the TMDSAS application. Click here for more information.

Personal Statement for Medical School Myths

Personal Statement Myths:The list below is based on an article I wrote all the way back in 2010 for The Student Doctor Network.I guess some solid advice never gets old.

#1: Never write about anything that took place in the past or before college.

#2: Never write about topics unrelated to medicine.

#3: Never write about a patient encounter or your own experience with health care.

#4: Always have a theme or a thesis.

#5: Dont write about anything negative.

Click here to read the article on SDN.

Example Personal Statement 

Synopsis: A first generation college student learns from family illness. This personal statement is an excerpt from The MedEdits Guide to Medical School Admissions, P. 162.

The AMCAS application to medical school asks for a lot of information about yourself. It includes biographical information, courses taken, and work experiences just to name a few.  The application also requires you to include a Personal Comments Essay, which is entered in section eight of the application. This essay provides an opportunity to distinguish yourself from other applicants and provide admissions officers with more insight into why you have chosen to pursue a career in medicine.

Many admissions committees place significant weight on this section, so we have compiled a list of seven tips to help you craft a well-organized and compelling essay.

1. Take the time to think about the content of your essay before writing a first draft. As you’re thinking about the structure of your essay, remember to keep the content general because it will go to all medical schools you apply to. Also try not to duplicate information provided elsewhere in the application as you only have about a page to write. Some questions you may want to consider before you begin writing include:

  • Why do you want a career in medicine?
  • What motivates you to learn more about medicine?
  • What should medical schools know about you that isn’t described in other sections of the application?

For more information, see Section 8 of the AMCAS Instruction Manual for suggestions of things to think about when writing this essay.

2. Include details that might better explain your path to medical school. For example, you might consider:

  • Addressing hardships, challenges, or obstacles that have influenced your educational pursuits.
  • Explaining significant fluctuations in your academic record not explained elsewhere in your application.

3. Show don’t tell. For example, if challenges in your childhood or a defining experience led you to consider medicine, use details to describe those experiences and bring life to your essay. 

4. Stay on topic. There is a 5,300 character limit (including spaces) in this section. This equals about one page of writing, single-spaced.  Make sure your essay is interesting, follows a logical and orderly flow, relates to your reasons for choosing medicine, and why you believe you will be successful as a physician.

5. Don’t be afraid of the editing process. Be sure to write more than one draft. Ask additional people to review and make edits to your essay. Having others read your essay will help you gain new perspectives on your writing and refine the story you want to tell admissions committees.

6. Remember to proofread and keep these formatting tips in mind. The AMCAS application does not include spell check, so be sure to proofread your essay for any typos or grammatical errors. You will not be able to go back into this section to make any edits after you submit your application. To avoid formatting issues, we recommend that you draft your essay in text-only word processing software, such as Microsoft Notepad or Mac TextEdit, then copy and paste your essay into the application. You can also type your essay directly into the AMCAS application.

7. If you are applying to MD-PhD programs, there are two additional essays you will need to complete. The first essay asks your reasons for pursuing the combined degree and is relatively short. The second essay asks you to describe your research activities and is about three pages long. You can read more about these additional essays in the AMCAS Instruction Manual or get further guidance from your pre-health advisor or career counselor.

For more AMCAS-related tips, please check out the AMCAS Tools and Tutorials page. There, you’ll find video tutorials, presentations, guides, and recordings of past webinars, including the Ask Admissions series. 

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